I’ve displayed in Part 1 the following survival foods: somtam, padthai, plapao, and plameuk. Shortly we will talk about some more survival foods. Comments, critics, and additional info from readers are most welcome as that can be useful for other readers. Thanks.

5) Kai-pla-muek (eggs of squid, it’s true!!)
A friend told me that this is made of eggs taken from the belly of a big pregnant squid-mom. It is then fried and served. That’s the simple explanation. It is served on a small styrofoam bowl with this manner: sliced cabbage layer at bottom, the sliced fried eggs of squid on top of the cabbages, and sauce all over (again, the same sauce like for plapao and plamuek).

Price: 20-30 baht.

kaiplameuk

kaiplameuk

6) Khao-pod (boiled sweet corn) and thua-li-song (groundnut)
This is just like in my hometown! They usually put the (boiled) sweet corns and the groundnut on a cart and warm them on boiled water. They are really natural (regardless the engineering they did to the corn) snacks I love. You’ll find that the vendor will dip the corn on a salty solution before serving it for you. That’s how Thais do it on a sweet corn. They cannot take only one taste in almost any food.

Price: 15-25 baht

khaopod vendor

khaopod vendor

7) Sweet pancake

Sorry I don’t know the local name (I’ll find out and update this posting, I promise). This is made of flour mixed with eggs, banana, and topped with milk and sugar. Typically, the sellers of this cakeiare men from neighboring Myanmar or Laos and they are usually Muslims. So once you see them around while you are starving to death, please don’t hesitate to ask the seller: khun Muselim?

Price : 15-25 baht.

sweet pancake vendor

sweet pancake vendor

8) Fruits
Nah, this is another easy-to-find food down town. The vendors sell the fruits in a two wheeled glass box displaying the pealed fresh fruits in crushed ice. The typical fruits they provide include: mango (ma-muang), ripe papaya (malakoa), guava (farang), pineapple (sapa-rot), rose apple (cham-poo), and watermelon (tang-mo). Normally they will also complete the fruits with a tiny plastic of salt.

Price: 10-20 baht.

fruit seller

fruit seller

9) Snacks
Finally, if you cannot find one of those mentioned before, you can always walk into a 7 Eleven or Family Mart store and grab some halal snacks. How can I know they are halal? Well, the good news is that they put the ‘halal’ logo on the packages for those which are halal. The halal products range from cracker, biscuits, potato chips, gum, milk, nut snacks, cup instant noodle and others.

Price: 10-30 baht.

halal snacks

halal snacks

That’s all the list of the survival foods. I believe there might be many more but excuse me as I’m a newbie myself🙂. Please remember again that except number 9, all are street foods which might be not acceptable and digestible for some of us.

Additional notes:

– Usually, street vendors use vegetable oil (not animal oil), but please make   sure again about that.

– Better to also check whether the vendor also sells other menus containing pork (I avoid to buy any of above foods if the vendor also provides pork/muu).

– Fried or grilled chicken is also widely available anywhere but I would absolutely be doubt that the chickens were slaughtered in Islamic way (zabiha). So I avoid them.

Also read : Some halal products in Bangkok stores.

Wassalam…